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Monthly Archives: May 2010

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AdWords Glitches? Google Says Shopping Campaigns Access Issues Have Been Fixed

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By Ginny Marvin

Paid search management is demanding enough without platform connectivity issues. Over the past weeks, several AdWords users have taken to Twitter to complain about ongoing issues with what’s come to be known as the “red bar of death”.

The red banner looks like this:

Last week, there was a widespread issue that affected user’s ability to access Shopping Campaigns in AdWords.

They clearly seem to feel like “Thanks for letting us know and rest assured we’re working on it” is an acceptable status for days or weeks on end. It is not. – See more at: http://neptunemoon.net/2014/11/is-adwords-being-evil-well-theyre-definitely-being-greedy-indifferent/#sthash.hVE1kW9v.dpuf
let’s be clear – it is costing real businesses real money. When I can’t adjust a bid to make sure my mobile heavy client remains in the 1st or 2nd position, they are losing exposure and therefore losing business. There is nothing theoretical about that. When I can’t add negative keywords to stop traffic that will never convert, that costs my clients real money. – See more at: http://neptunemoon.net/2014/11/is-adwords-being-evil-well-theyre-definitely-being-greedy-indifferent/#sthash.hVE1kW9v.dpuf
When I can’t adjust a bid to make sure my mobile heavy client remains in the 1st or 2nd position, they are losing exposure and therefore losing business. There is nothing theoretical about that. When I can’t add negative keywords to stop traffic that will never convert, that costs my clients real money. – See more at: http://neptunemoon.net/2014/11/is-adwords-being-evil-well-theyre-definitely-being-greedy-indifferent/#sthash.hVE1kW9v.dpuf
The person on my case does seem to be trying to work on resolving the issue and I appreciate that. It does seem kind of ridiculous that the issue is clearly widespread and the support team needs screenshots and to know exactly what you were trying to do when the issues occur. There is clearly something very wrong with the system right now. – See more at: http://neptunemoon.net/2014/11/is-adwords-being-evil-well-theyre-definitely-being-greedy-indifferent/#sthash.hVE1kW9v.dpuf
The person on my case does seem to be trying to work on resolving the issue and I appreciate that. It does seem kind of ridiculous that the issue is clearly widespread and the support team needs screenshots and to know exactly what you were trying to do when the issues occur. There is clearly something very wrong with the system right now. – See more at: http://neptunemoon.net/2014/11/is-adwords-being-evil-well-theyre-definitely-being-greedy-indifferent/#sthash.hVE1kW9v.dpuf

@Hoffman8 I can’t access @adwords PLA Ad Groups in Firefox and they are slow to load in Chrome. :( #ppcchat

— James Svoboda (@Realicity) November 13, 2014

Reached for comment this weekend, a Google spokesperson said, “We are aware of an issue that was intermittently affecting some Shopping campaigns, but it has since been resolved.”

Complaints Of More Persistent Issues

The Shopping Campaigns problem came amidst growing frustration among some users who say they’ve been having ongoing connectivity issues for weeks and haven’t received adequate response from Google.

It’s not clear how widespread these problems are, but Google is addressing the complaints on an individual basis and has not acknowledged any specific issue affecting a large number of users as it did with Shopping Campaigns. Meanwhile, some are continuing to see the red bar today.

adwords red bar of death issuesAfter repeatedly voicing their frustrations on Twitter via the PPCChat hashtag about connectivity issues, two users blogged about their experiences on Friday.

Melissa Mackay, Search Supervisor at creative agency, Gyro, received a response on Twitter from the AdWords social support team after several tweets and one that asked, “Why the silence on this issue?”

The team sent her a private link to fill out an error report through Twitter. As Mackay wrote on her blog, Google said because these reports are handled on an individual basis, the link couldn’t be shared with others. When she asked if there was a link she could pass along to others having similar issues, Google sent her to the generic to the AdWords support page.

When I can’t adjust a bid to make sure my mobile heavy client remains in the 1st or 2nd position, they are losing exposure and therefore losing business. There is nothing theoretical about that. When I can’t add negative keywords to stop traffic that will never convert, that costs my clients real money. – See more at: http://neptunemoon.net/2014/11/is-adwords-being-evil-well-theyre-definitely-being-greedy-indifferent/#sthash.hVE1kW9v.dpuf
The person on my case does seem to be trying to work on resolving the issue and I appreciate that. It does seem kind of ridiculous that the issue is clearly widespread and the support team needs screenshots and to know exactly what you were trying to do when the issues occur. There is clearly something very wrong with the system right now. – See more at: http://neptunemoon.net/2014/11/is-adwords-being-evil-well-theyre-definitely-being-greedy-indifferent/#sthash.hVE1kW9v.dpuf

Frustrations & Financial Consequences

Julie Bacchini, Founder and President of digital agency, Neptune Moon LLC, says she, too, said she has experienced “seemingly constant malfunctioning of the AdWords interface” that can have real financial ramifications for her clients. She wrote on her blog:

“When I can’t adjust a bid to make sure my mobile heavy client remains in the 1st or 2nd position, they are losing exposure and therefore losing business. There is nothing theoretical about that.”

Complaints about Google customer support are nothing new, of course. And a responsive social team can only carry a matter so far. But users that are experiencing ongoing system failures say they feel like these issues aren’t being addressed with enough urgency:

“They clearly seem to feel like ‘Thanks for letting us know and rest assured we’re working on it’ is an acceptable status for days or weeks on end. It is not,” writes Bacchini.

Because she can’t always access her AdWords accounts, “Changes are not saved. Bids are not modified. Negative keywords are not added. Keywords are not added, paused or unpaused. Research into account performance is not able to happen. The list goes on,” she adds.

To be clear, it’s not clear how many are having these persistent issues. But having even a handful of users not be able to successfully access and manage their clients’ accounts — particularly during the holiday season — is a problem that gets compounded when those users don’t feel that their concerns are being addressed aggressively.

The post AdWords Glitches? Google Says Shopping Campaigns Access Issues Have Been Fixed appeared first on Search Engine Land.

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E-Commerce 101: 12 Last Minute Ways to Optimize Your Website For the Holiday Season by @albertcostill

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By Albert Costill

It only seemed like yesterday that it was November 1st, aka the day after Halloween. As I was getting ready for my final Halloween party of the year, I noticed that nearly every other ad that popped up was for the holiday season. While this isn’t exactly groundbreaking, it definitely felt like the upcoming rush of the holidays was suddenly upon us. As marketers, we’ve been preparing for the holidays for months – whether we like it or not. Why? Because it’s the most wonderful time of the year – and that’s not including the holiday cheer, festivities, and exchanging of […]

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App Extensions Coming To Bing Ads

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By Ginny Marvin

Source: Microsoft

App extensions will be available to advertisers on Bing Ads starting next spring. Timed to coincide with the removal of explicit mobile OS targeting, app extensions will be targeted automatically to a user’s OS and device.

The extensions will feature an app’s icon and a call-to-action to download the app, as opposed to a click-to-download button.

Advertisers will be able to promote apps available for download on iOS, Android and Windows Phone devices.

This is the first foray into mobile app extensions for Bing Ads. It’s likely to just be the start, but Microsoft is behind in this area. Google AdWords already offers a similar app discovery extension as well as app re-engagement ads on search and YouTube, and both Facebook and Twitter offer app ads that have proven successful.

Bing does offer organic app linking from Bing’s search results to Windows or Windows Phone apps.

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SearchCap: Bing Local Carousel, NORAD Tracker & Yahoo Search Trends

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By Barry Schwartz

Below is what happened in search today, as reported on Search Engine Land and from other places across the web.

From Search Engine Land:

Recent Headlines From Marketing Land, Our Sister Site Dedicated To Internet Marketing:

Search News From Around The Web:

Industry

Link Building

Searching

SEO

SEM / Paid Search

Search Marketing

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Mobile SEO & E-Commerce Growth Beyond Black Friday & Cyber Monday

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By Jim Yu

As we come down off the high from Black Friday and Cyber Monday, we’ll no doubt be looking at some exciting preliminary figures for commerce online.

But it’s not time to kick up our feet quite yet. According to data cited by Google, 48 percent of shoppers will do their shopping in early December. Additionally, due to the last-minute gift rush, December 21 and 23 were shown to be the best in-store shopping days aside from Black Friday in 2013.

The forecast continues to look good this year in terms of online shopping. The National Retail Federation reported that more than half of U.S. consumers planned to make at least some of their holiday purchases online this year.

The purchase journey online will consist of multiple devices, as expected. According to the 2014 Pre-Holiday Retailer and Consumer Study by Shop.org, people are using their smartphones and tablets specifically to:

  • Research products (42 percent smartphone, 53 percent tablet)
  • Look up store contact and hours information (one-third of those surveyed)

Mobile users are also converting at a growing rate. According to IBM ExperienceOne, 19.1 percent of all website sales in December 2013 were on smartphones and tablets – more than three times that of December 2011.

Numbers from this year are sure to reflect an even larger growth as more brands become mobile friendly.

In fact, research coming from BrightEdge shows smartphone and tablet sales for the first three quarters of 2013 rivaled desktop in average order size; smartphone conversions increased 26 percent in Q3 from Q1 2014.

traffic-conversion-aos

To illustrate, the following chart shows the average order size by device for the retail industry, indexed to desktop performance.

As marketers, we’re on a constant iterative cycle to take what we’ve learned and apply it to the next marketing cycle, so no doubt there will be some interesting takeaways from our holiday marketing campaigns in 2014.

However, we also need to capitalize on new trends and skillfully implement best practices. Beyond just having a mobile-optimized site, brands may want to consider creating device-specific experiences to cater to the growing number of shoppers who are researching and buying on mobile.

With that, let’s look at ways we can ramp up in 2015 so next holiday season is even brighter.

3 Ways To Serve The Mobile Consumer In 2015

To serve the mobile consumer in 2015: (1) decide which mobile configuration is best, (2) use device-specific content, and (3) ensure your mobile analytics program allows for device data segmentation.

1. Mobile Configuration: Decide Which Is Best

Google recently launched “mobile friendly” labels for its search results pages in an effort to make the experience more streamlined for users. Here’s an example of what that looks like to mobile users:

example-yu

You don’t want to risk missing out on clicks from mobile users in 2015. So, decide which type of mobile configuration is best to optimize the experience for your mobile website visitors: a responsive design, dynamically serving web pages, or a separate mobile site.

2. Mobile Experience: Device-Specific Content

Remember, however, that one type of mobile configuration is not always a one-size-fits-all solution. It’s best not to force visitors into one experience or the other.

Create and optimize content specifically for the mobile device and the goal. At minimum, add images, icons, buttons and calls-to-action with the mobile experience in mind, rather than relying solely on desktop content that shrinks to a mobile screen.

Additionally, test and optimize for mobile conversions by analyzing the shopping cart and checkout experience via a mobile device.

3. Mobile Measurement: Segment Data Well

Finally, set up your mobile analytics so it reports key metrics separately from desktop data. Benchmark to industry standards; based on that, make plans to improve and optimize your mobile site experience.

As we wrap up the 2014 holiday shopping season, there’s no better time to plan for next year’s marketing. That includes not only looking back at our performance this year but also looking ahead to the holiday and mobile shopping trends on the horizon.

The post Mobile SEO & E-Commerce Growth Beyond Black Friday & Cyber Monday appeared first on Search Engine Land.

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18 Things You Should Know About Baidu by @albertcostill

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By Albert Costill

Here in the States we have popular search engine by the name of Google. In China, the dominant search engine is Baidu. While Google shouldn’t be concerned about Baidu taking any of its share in the search engine market Stateside, people from all over the world can’t stop talking about the popular Chinese search engine. Investors love it. The tech world has been fascinated by the hiring of computer scientist and robotics engineer Professor Andrew Ng. And those of us involved with search have been paying close attention to Baidu’s powerful computer cluster. That’s not to say that during the […]

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EU Issues “Right To Be Forgotten” Criteria

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By Greg Sterling

Last week the EU issued formal guidelines surrounding the so-called “Right to Be Forgotten” (RTBF). They are intended to help privacy regulators and search engines implement the RTBF. And they include some controversial elements.

I’ve embedded the full document below and won’t try and treat it comprehensively. Below are the formal considerations that the EU data protection authorities want considered in evaluating any RTBF request:

  1. Does the search result relate to a natural person – i.e. an individual? And does the search result come up against a search on the data subject’s name?
  2. Does the data subject play a role in public life? Is the data subject a public figure?
  3. Is the data subject a minor?
  4. Is the data accurate?
  5. Is the data relevant and not excessive?
  6. Is the information sensitive within the meaning of Article 8 of the Directive 95/46/EC?
  7. Is the data up to date? Is the data being made available for longer than is necessary for the purpose of the processing?
  8. Is the data processing causing prejudice to the data subject? Does the data have a disproportionately negative privacy impact on the data subject?
  9. Does the search result link to information that puts the data subject at risk?
  10. In what context was the information published?
  11. Was the original content published in the context of journalistic purposes?
  12. Does the publisher of the data have a legal power – or a legal obligation– to make the personal data publicly available?
  13. Does the data relate to a criminal offence?

These criteria were apparently established through review of the initial wave of RTBF requests following the announcement of the right by the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) earlier this year. The EU says that no single criterion will likely be determinative and they should be seen as a “flexible working tool”:

The list of criteria should be seen as a flexible working tool which will help DPAs during their decision-making process. The criteria will be applied in accordance with the relevant national legislation.

In most cases, it appears that more than one criterion will need to be taken into account in order to reach a decision. In other words, no single criterion is, in itself, determinative.

Each criterion has to be applied in the light of the principles established by the CJEU and in particular in the light of the “the interest of the general public in having access to [the] information”.

The document asserts that successful RTBF requests should be applied globally and not just to specific country domain search results, as Google has been doing:

[D]e-listing decisions must be implemented in a way that guarantees the effective and complete protection of these rights and that EU law cannot be easily circumvented. In that sense, limiting de-listing to EU domains on the grounds that users tend to access search engines via their national domains cannot be considered a sufficient means to satisfactorily guarantee the rights of data subjects according to the judgment. In practice, this means that in any case de-listing should also be effective on all relevant domains, including .com

While this is logical, any such global de-listing sets up a conflict of laws between nations that recognize RTBF and those that do not.

Google had been notifying publishers that their links were being removed, causing some to republish those links for re-indexing. This has frustrated some European officials who see this practice — both by the search engine and the publisher — as “undermining” RTBF. Accordingly, the EU says that publishers should not be notified of the removal of links:

Search engine managers should not as a general practice inform the webmasters of the pages affected by de-listing of the fact that some webpages cannot be acceded from the search engine in response to specific queries. Such a communication has no legal basis under EU data protection law.

The EU also doesn’t want Google to publish notices to users that links have been removed for similar reasons:

It appears that some search engines have developed the practice of systematically informing the users of search engines of the fact that some results to their queries have been de-listed in response to requests of an individual. If such information would only be visible in search results where hyperlinks were actually de-listed, this would strongly undermine the purpose of the ruling. Such a practice can only be acceptable if the information is offered in such a way that users cannot in any case come to the conclusion that a specific individual has asked for the de-listing of results concerning him or her.

The guidelines reaffirm that the RTBF only concerns search engines as “data controllers” and do not apply to the original source of information. This offers some “cover” against claims of censorship: “the information isn’t being removed entirely just from search indexes.” In other words RTBF doesn’t censor information it just makes that information more difficult to discover.

The guidelines state that beyond “external search engines” (e.g., Google) they may be extended to undefined “intermediaries.” However they immediately go on to apparently contradict that notion: “the right to de-listing should not apply to search engines with a restricted field of action, particularly in the case of search tools of websites of newspapers.”

RTBF is a legitimate attempt to mitigate the potentially negative impact of the internet’s unforgiving memory on personal reputations and private lives. However as implemented RTBF is sloppy, partly incoherent and potentially even dangerous in cases where non-public-figure bad actors (e.g., corrupt private company executive) seek to “cover their tracks” by removing damaging or incriminating information. Imagine that unscrupulous executive later runs for public office — s/he might seek RTBF in anticipation of a future non-declared political run depriving the public of important background information.

To protect against such situations RTBF should set a high bar for removal rather than the relatively low bar that has been set here.

Finally the guidelines suggest that only EU citizens may be eligible in practice to make RTBF requests. You can review the entire document for yourself below.

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Understanding Question/Query Answering In Search & How It Relates To Your Website

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By Barbara Starr

Search engines are evolving. Search is not only becoming faster, it’s becoming more predictive and conversational — more like a personal assistant.

In the old days, search engine results pages (SERPs) presented little more than a collection of 10 blue links — the results of a search over web documents. These listings typically consisted of the URL along with a “snippet” of text and perhaps some other information. Search engines became quite adept at determining and displaying relevant and readable snippets.

As search engines began to incorporate search over data into their algorithms, results pages evolved accordingly. SERPs now feature engaging displays that include knowledge panels, answers to questions, rich snippets and more. In some cases, these enhanced listings are even actionable – such as a phone number on Google, which you can click to call (via mobile or Google Hangouts).

With the shift from search-over-documents to search-over-data comes a new set of challenges for search marketers. How can we create interesting and relevant content that will both surface in SERPs and also elicit a desired action?

The solution lies in determining what kinds of questions your target audience is asking and how to supply the content for each type of question.

What Kind Of Questions Can Your Content Answer?

It is possible to address many question types (as I have mentioned in previous posts that discuss form-based, or parameterized, queries).

However, to illustrate the overarching concept of optimizing content to answer questions, this post will only delve into a few specific examples. (If there are any specific types of queries or questions you are interested in knowing about, feel free to request it as a topic for Search Engine Land in the comments below or contact me.)

Here, I will address queries that deal with contact information as well as product search queries as they relate to Google Shopping.

Query Types That Ask For A Phone Number

Google provides very clear instructions for using structured data markup to get your company’s phone number(s) included in search results.

In the examples below, you can see that Organization and ContactPoint are the two Schemas defined as a minimum requirement in order for this to occur.

Specifying Corporate Contacts with JSON-LD

Specifying corporate contacts with structured data markup

In the example on the above right, you can see how extended markup is used to specify different types of business numbers, such as “technical support,” “customer service,” “bill payment” and so on. There is also a means to deal with “accessibility” here, such as specifying a separate phone number (contact point) for hearing impaired users.

Once implemented, you can test your markup for this in Google’s corporate contacts markup tester tool here.

Presenting Contact Information Using Tables

Of course, there are other ways to provide Google with structured data about your contact information. For example, Google recently announced the introduction of “Structured Snippets,” in which relevant information is extracted from tables on a web page and displayed in search result snippets.

If you have multiple contact points, it may behoove you to place all of that information in a well-labeled web table. Below is an example of some search results that clearly leverage this implementation.

Structured Snippets Derived from Tables

Structured Snippets Derived from Tables

Product Search Queries/Questions

For those in the retail space, it is worth examining the kinds of queries that Google may be leveraging for Google Shopping. This now falls largely under SEM rather than SEO, since Google now requires merchants to pay to be included in results, but it is important to understand how Google is determining relevance.

Although there are many form-based queries shoppers use that are pretty easy to distinguish as product searches – examples would be “black dresses under $X.00″ and so on – we can take this a step further by looking at Google’s U.S. Patent application 20140143254, called “Category and Attribute Specifications for Product Search Queries,” which describes the queries a user may enter, and the way a search engine might determine the direct correlation between those queries (questions) and the corresponding product category.

In its application, Google uses the example of the query [50 mm ef lens]. Though the query doesn’t specify the product type, a method could be used to infer that the user wants camera lenses – and, in addition, that “the desired focal length is 50 mm and the desired mount type is Canon EF.”

By contrast, a query like [acuvue lens] also uses the ambiguous term “lens.” But, by pairing that with the other term — the brand name Acuvue – the search engine could determine that contact lenses were the appropriate category in that case.

Diagram from Patent Application

Diagram from Patent Application. Boxes 160, 150, 170 and 180 are used to determine the appropriate category when a query is ambiguous.

Each product category (once mapped) would have its own SERP type with a GUI similar to a landing page. When Google is highly confident it has figured out what type of product a user is looking for, it offers options for narrowing the search in the left sidebar, similar to what you might see on an e-commerce site like Amazon.com. (However, it is provided by Google Shopping and not an e-commerce site on the web.)

This is illustrated in part in the diagram below. The diagram depicted on the left-hand side is derived from the Google patent. The image on the right-hand side is from the same query run live in Google Shopping as of November 2, 2014. The corresponding mappings are depicted in the diagram with the commonalities illustrated in point.

Mapping to diagram in Google Shopping Patent entitled “Category and Attribute Specifications for Product Search Queries””

Looking at the details of this, one can see that the “Answer” to the “Product Query” is, in fact, the category itself (the most granular and most specific that can be determined) and the “category page displayed” as the “Answer” to the query is the one portrayed above. That page is illustrated in the above example on the right-hand side.

To put it in SEO terms, the product category generates an interim page (landing page) that covers all future questions that could be asked about that product category, with the attribute selectors (faceted search) specified on the left-hand side for further drilldown.

This explains why Google wants the product category so well and accurately specified (to the most granular definition possible in terms of its product taxonomy hierarchy) in the product feed advertisers/merchants submit.

This would imply the “answer” to any product query is, in fact, stipulated in the product feed itself (assuming the product category field is correctly mapped when submitted by a merchant).

Here are some excerpts from Google’s Merchant Support pages that shed light on how it looks upon the matter:

  • Use The Full “Breadcrumb” Information. Wherever possible, we recommend you include more granular categories as it provides us with more precise classification signals. For example, Books > Non-Fiction > Sports > Baseball is better than Baseball. You must use “>” as a separator, including a space before and after the symbol. If you submit multiple values separated by a comma, only the first value will be used as the ‘product type’ for your Shopping campaigns.
  • Use The Most Specific Category Possible. Being specific will help improve your data quality and, in turn, ensures that offers are presented in the right category. When viewing the taxonomy, try to navigate to the most specific category that still covers all the products being submitted. For instance, if you are submitting MP3 player chargers use the category MP3 Player Chargers. Conversely, if you are submitting multiple types of chargers use the category Chargers.

It is worth noting that Google updates its category taxonomy every three months. Though it still supports categories published in past taxonomies back to August 2011, it stands to reason that abiding more closely to the current taxonomy would be beneficial.

Takeaways/Other Question Types

There are many other types of queries that can be asked of Google that typically take specific formats, both in terms of the query templates and the results presentation templates.

A few means of supplying structured data to Google are as follows:

  • Structured markup on your web pages using schema.org
  • Structured information in the form of tables (ideally with some semantic alignment to schema.org)
  • Information in the Linking Open Data cloud tends to be fertile ground for seeding knowledge graphs. Try to provide strong and consistent signals by placing relevant, high-precision information in locales such as Freebase, Wikidata and other such places.
  • Leverage items such as APIs, data feeds, Atom feeds and other similar formats to ensure timely updates of your information and to ensure consistency of the signals you send across all sources that search engines may reference (or cross reference or corroborate) .
  • Leverage all forms and mechanisms that may entail structured information representation, such as inherent structure in the HTML DOM or more specific structure in HTML5.

Bear in mind, all of these mechanisms need to send consistent signals to the search engines in terms of both the type and quality of content you are providing.

With the shift from search-over-documents to search-over-data, when search engines provide an answer to a question or some equivalent function, they need to be able to assert their answer to a question with high confidence by leveraging high precision data internally. Ensure you can provide consistent high-precision data in as many ways as are appropriate.

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Top Local And Mobile Search Engine Ranking Factors: An Interview With Marcus Tober by @lorenbaker

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By Loren Baker

At Pubcon 2014 in Las Vegas, I had the opportunity to sit down and talk to Marcus Tober, CTO at Searchmetrics, about what’s new in local and mobile search. Ever year Searchmetrics releases a report about top ranking factors with a comparison to the previous year. In this interview I ask Marcus to go into some detail about the top ranking factors for 2014. If you want to know which factors Google is weighing heavily in search right now, you’re going to want to watch the interview below: Here are some key takeaways from the video: With search diversifying into […]

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Twitter: Renewed Focus On SEO Generated 10 Times More Visitors

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By Danny Sullivan

Think social media has killed search as a traffic driver? Think again, given that social media giant Twitter shared today that SEO has helped it generate a 10-times increase in logged-out visitors to its web site.

The news came during the Twitter Analyst Day event today. Twitter’s director of product management Trevor O’Brien said the company made a change earlier this year to ensure that search engines like Google and Bing could better access 50,000 popular hashtag pages — pages where Twitter has compiled tweets and information relating to a particular hashtag.

For example, if you were interested in the #AlexFromTwitter hashtag that went viral last week, you might search for that on Google. If so, Twitter’s hashtag about it ranks in the top results:

alexfromtarget google 800

People clicking from there land on a page all about the hashtag:

alexfromtarget twitter 800

Twitter says making this change increased the number of logged-out users coming to its site by 10-fold, apparently raising the number from 7.5 million per month to the current 75 million per month.

For logged-out users, the main call-to-action on these pages is to encourage them to sign-up for Twitter. However, Twitter is exploring other ideas on how to make money off these pages.

Ironically, Twitter once had huge amounts of Google traffic coming its way through a deal it has struck with the search giant. That deal fell apart in 2011. For more background on that, in light of today’s news, see our companion story on Marketing Land:

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